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State health money goes toward combating valley fever
KVOA.com, Gov. Janet Napolitano has released $50,000 in health crisis funds to combat an outbreak of valley fever in Arizona. The money will ...

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Governor releases money to combat valley fever
KPHO Phoenix, AZ - TUCSON, Ariz. Governor Napolitano has freed up 50-thousand dollars in funds to combat an ongoing outbreak of valley fever in Arizona. ...

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Money allocated to fight fevers
Arizona Daily Star, AZ - In an effort to combat the ongoing outbreak of valley fever in Arizona now affecting hundreds of Tucsonans Gov. ...

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Valley Fever Vaccine Project of the Americas

ALL VALLEY FEVER VACCINE SUPPORTERS - Your action is requested in support of US Congressman Bill Thomas' proposed $45,000,000 Valley Fever legislation. California Assemblywoman Nicole Parra has presented a "members request" to the committee for $1,000,000 for Valley Fever vaccine research. (click on the link above)

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Valley fever cure a step closer

Apr. 12, 2006 The federal government is backing the first potential cure for valley fever, a serious lung disease that has spiked in recent years and afflicted thousands of Arizonans. "The fact that this drug is going forward is exciting," said Dr. John Galgiani, director of UA's Valley Fever Center for Excellence. Nikkomycin z has been shown to kill the fungus in mice. The FDA backing will provide financial and other support to take the research to a higher level, including tax credits and market exclusivity for a commercial partner to test the drug and bring it to market. Galgiani has applied for a federal grant worth upward of $1 million over three years to test and develop nikkomycin z.

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Valley fever infections continue to climb

Nov 18, 2005 So puzzling is the dramatic increase in valley fever, that the Centers for Disease Control sent a team of researchers here this month to help state health workers collect patient information and analyze data for an ongoing study, Engelthaler said. Valley fever, or coccidiomycosis, is caused by a fungus in desert soil. When the soil is disturbed, by digging or by wind, construction or dust storms, the fungus releases spores that, when inhaled, can lead to infection. There are about 150,000 people in the southwestern United States infected with Valley fever each year, with about 50,000 becoming sick. Of those, a few go on to have severe complications, said Dr. John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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U of A researcher has helped decode the genetics

April 28, 2005 Marc Orbach, a researcher in the UA's Department of Plant Sciences, is a co-author of a paper that is the first-ever to spell out the DNA code of the rice blast fungus.

He also studies Texas Root Rot, which plagues cotton and alfalfa, and the fungus that causes Valley Fever in people and other animals.

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Valley Fever Center for Excellence won a $4.5 million grant

June 22, 2004  The Valley Fever Center for Excellence won a $4.5 million grant to fund research on vaccines and immunologic therapy for patients who have the disease. The grant will be given by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases over five years to the Valley Fever Center, a joint project by the University of Arizona and Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System.

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AEGIS - Coccidioidomycosis very dangerous opportunistic infection

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AllRefer.com health - Acute Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

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AllRefer.com health - Chronic Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

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AllRefer.com health - Coccidioidomycosis or San Joaquin Valley Fever

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AllRefer.com health - Disseminated or Systemic Coccidioidomycosis

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AllRefer.com health - Skin Lesion of Coccidioidomycosis

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azcentral.com - Tenacious Valley Fever Runs Gamut

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CDC DBMD - Coccidioidomycosis

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Complement Fixation Blood Test

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eMedicine - Coccidioidomycosis by Sat Sharma, MD, FRCPC, FACP

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Hospital Practice with Coccidioidomycosis

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iVillage - Coccidioidomycosis, What is valley fever?

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Treatment Guidelines for Valley Fever

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Tucson Doctor Makes Progress On Valley Fever Vaccine

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UA Researcher Helps Decode Genetics Of Fungus

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University of Arizona - Valley Fever Center for Excellence

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Valley Fever: It's in the air

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WorldNow News 4 - Coccidioidomycosis

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Valley fever, also known as San Joaquin Valley fever or coccidioidomycosis, is an infection by the fungus Coccidioides immitus. As the name "valley fever" implies, the fungus is found only in certain regions. In the United States, it is found in the desert Southwest, including California's San Joaquin valley. It also grows in parts of Central and South America. The fungus lives in the soil and releases its spores into the air. Outbreaks occur during weather changes, dust storms and earthquakes, all of which increase the amount of spores dispersed into the air.
 
People become infected by inhaling the spores. About 60 percent of people infected in this way have no symptoms at all. The other 40 percent may have chest pain, weakness, fever, chills, night sweats, joint aches and a cough that may produce phlegm. Some people also have a skin rash and enlarged lymph nodes
 
In about 5 percent of infected people who get better without complications, future chest X-rays will show small spots (nodules) or even holes (cavities) in the lung tissue. These changes do not indicate a threat to the health of the patient, but they could be mistaken for lung cancer or another problem later in life.

In a few patients, the illness does not go away but progresses to a severe (and in rare cases fatal) pneumonia. In another rare complication, which occurs in fewer than 1 percent of those infected, the infection can spread outside the lung. This so-called disseminated disease is for some reason more common in men, pregnant women, and individuals of dark-skinned races, such as those of African, Filipino and Native American descent. It is most common, however, in people with immune-system disorders.

2006 Valley-Fever.org All rights reserved Microbiology, Mycology, Fungal Resources
Valley Fever, Coccidiomycosis, Valley Fever Treatment, Coccidiomycosis, Valley Fever Connections