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Valley Fever Center for Excellence

The Valley Fever Center for Excellence (VFCE) was established in 1995 and is located at the Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System's facility (Tucson VA Medical Center) and is jointly sponsored by the University of Arizona and the Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System.

The Valley Fever Center for Excellence is the only center of its type and is a regional, national and international resource. It provides a multi-faceted awareness program to the public, medical practitioners and health care workers. The Valley Fever Center for Excellence operates an informational HOTLINE [(520) 629-4777] for information about the disease, its diagnosis and treatment. The Valley Fever Center for Excellence maintains a website (English and Spanish) and answers questions by electronic mail [ vfever@email.arizona.edu ].

The Valley Fever Center for Excellence has also developed a Valley Fever Syllabus for Medical Practitioners (available in English and Spanish) which has been transferred into electronic media as part of an internet, self-study CME course for health care professionals.

The Valley Fever Center for Excellence provides information to the public, physician consultations with Valley Fever Center for Excellence physicians and promotes research into all aspects of the disease. Valley Fever Evaluation and Treatment Clinics are operated each week at the Southern Arizona VA Health Care System and at St. Luke’s Clinic, University Medical Center. The Valley Fever Center for Excellence facilitates, stimulates and fosters research by providing a public profile for Valley Fever and by sponsoring collaboration among clinicians and research investigators. Primary areas of research are in the fields of Valley Fever causes risk factors, immunology, fungal growth, and fungus adaptation within soil or during infection as well as on the development of a vaccine.

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Valley fever cure a step closer

Apr. 12, 2006 The federal government is backing the first potential cure for valley fever, a serious lung disease that has spiked in recent years and afflicted thousands of Arizonans. "The fact that this drug is going forward is exciting," said Dr. John Galgiani, director of UA's Valley Fever Center for Excellence. Nikkomycin z has been shown to kill the fungus in mice. The FDA backing will provide financial and other support to take the research to a higher level, including tax credits and market exclusivity for a commercial partner to test the drug and bring it to market. Galgiani has applied for a federal grant worth upward of $1 million over three years to test and develop nikkomycin z. Treating Valley Fever causes risk factors

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Valley fever infections continue to climb

Nov 18, 2005 So puzzling is the dramatic increase in valley fever, that the Centers for Disease Control sent a team of researchers here this month to help state health workers collect patient information and analyze data for an ongoing study, Engelthaler said. Valley fever, or coccidiomycosis, is caused by a fungus in desert soil. When the soil is disturbed, by digging or by wind, construction or dust storms, the fungus releases spores that, when inhaled, can lead to infection. There are about 150,000 people in the southwestern United States infected with Valley fever each year, with about 50,000 becoming sick. Valley Fever causes risk factors of those, a few go on to have severe complications, said Dr. John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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U of A researcher has helped decode the genetics

April 28, 2005 Marc Orbach, a researcher in the UA's Department of Plant Sciences, is a co-author of a paper that is the first-ever to spell out the DNA code of the rice blast fungus.

He also studies Texas Root Rot, which plagues cotton and alfalfa, and the fungus that causes Valley Fever in people and other animals.

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Valley Fever Center for Excellence won a $4.5 million grant

June 22, 2004  The Valley Fever Center for Excellence won a $4.5 million grant to fund research on vaccines and immunologic therapy for patients who have the disease. The grant will be given by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases over five years to the Valley Fever Center, a joint project by the University of Arizona and Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System.

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Biological Warfare and Its Cutaneous Manifestations

Valley Fever? Biological warfare agents have gained attention in recent years. This article attempts to eliminate some of that mystery by discussing the history and background of biological weapons and by reviewing agents that cause cutaneous disease.

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Valley Fever related to amphotericin B therapy

A 20-year-old African–American male presented to an outside facility with fevers, night sweats, cough, myalgias and skin eruptions in the naso-labial fold 10 months after moving to an area endemic for Valley Fever. Culture of, and histopathology from, skin biopsy revealed Valley Fever causes risk. Serum complement fixation (CF) titre at the time of diagnosis was 1:128 .

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Valley Fever Project

In 1995 the Valley Fever Americas Foundation was formed, and incorporated as a nonprofit tax-exempt foundation in 1996.

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Valley Fever Climate Factors Influencing Seasonality and Outbreaks

Although broad links between climatic factors and valley fever have been established, the
identification of simple and robust relationships linking climatic controls to seasonal
timing and outbreaks of the valley fever disease has remained elusive.

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